Researchers create vaccine that blocks fentanyl from affecting brain: Report

Nebraska Execution
FILE- In this June 1, 2018 file photo, small vials of fentanyl are shown in the inpatient pharmacy at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. Nebraska state officials are preparing for their first execution in two decades on Aug. 14 at the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, Neb., and their first-ever lethal injection with an untried combination of drugs. The new execution protocol calls for an initial IV dose of diazepam, commonly known as Valium, to render the inmate unconscious; the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl; cisatracurium besylate to induce paralysis and stop the inmate from breathing; and potassium chloride to stop the heart. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

Researchers create vaccine that blocks fentanyl from affecting brain: Report

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Scientists at the University of Houston have reportedly created a vaccine that would block fentanyl from affecting the brain.

The vaccine, which has only been tested on rats so far, trains T-cells to create antibodies, which then bind to the drug in the bloodstream and prevent it from getting to the brain, according to a report from the Daily Mail.

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The report says the vaccine is a three-dose treatment, with each shot given every three weeks. Researchers told the outlet they are aiming to begin phase one trials in 2023.

“When you get a vaccine, we’re usually vaccinating people against [viruses], but here we are vaccinating a person against a chemical,” lead researcher Dr. Colin Haile told the Daily Mail.

Fentanyl is one of the deadliest drugs in the United States, with 71,238 people dying from an overdose of the drug in 2021, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In comparison, only 32,856 people died from meth overdoses and 24,538 people died from cocaine overdoses in the same year.

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Authorities were warning of fentanyl being disguised as candy during the Halloween season.

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