Hybrid workers get paid more than in-person and remote workers: Report

Kelly Mack
Kelly Mack works on her laptop to teach remotely from her early 1940s vintage turquoise camper/trailer at her house back yard in Evanston, Ill., Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. Most students in Illinois have been starting remote learning this fall, according to results from an Illinois State Board of Education survey. Kelly Mack teaches math at Nichols middle school in Evanston, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh) Nam Y. Huh/AP

Hybrid workers get paid more than in-person and remote workers: Report

Video Embed

With the coronavirus pandemic came the rise of remote and hybrid working, and people continue to work out of the office as the pandemic winds down.

A report from WFH Research suggests people who work on a hybrid schedule make more than those who work entirely remotely or in person.

HOME PRICES DOWN YEAR OVER YEAR, BREAKING RECORD 131-MONTH STREAK OF INCREASES

Workers who take a hybrid schedule between work and home make an average of at least $80,000 per year, and the figure increases based on the number of days they work from home.

Those who work from home one out of the five work days make an average of $80,000 per year. Those who work from home two out of the five days make an average of $84,000 per year, and those who work from home three or four out of five days make an average of $88,000 per year.

Workers who attend in-person all five days of the work week make an average of $55,000 per year, while those who work all five days of the work week remotely make an average of $74,000 per year.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The report says the discrepancies between the average pay based on working arrangements can be traced to the type of work remote workers can do compared to jobs that have to be done in person.

Jobs in which people work fully in person tend to be service or specialty jobs, and remote work typically includes jobs that require a college education and are more about knowledge as opposed to physical labor.

© 2023 Washington Examiner

Related articles

Share article

Latest articles