How Hispanic voters helped DeSantis clinch massive victory in Florida

Desantis
Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis greets the crowd as he takes the stage for his Jacksonville campaign rally. (Bob Self/Florida Times-Union via AP)

How Hispanic voters helped DeSantis clinch massive victory in Florida

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis made significant gains with Hispanic voters during the 2022 midterm election, helping push the Republican incumbent to victory and secure a second term in office.

DeSantis had a 15-point advantage with Hispanic voters over Democratic challenger Charlie Crist, with 57% of Latinos voting for the Republican governor, compared to 42% for Crist, according to ABC News. Those numbers show significant growth among the voting bloc compared to the 2018 election when Democrat Andrew Gillum won among Hispanic voters by 10 points over DeSantis.

DESANTIS CRUISES TO REELECTION AS FLORIDA GOVERNOR OVER CRIST

The Republican governor also made gains with non-Cuban Hispanic voters, winning the demographic by 5 points over Crist, according to exit polls. That’s a massive swing from 2018, when Gillum won among non-Cuban Hispanic voters by 30 points.

DeSantis defeated Crist, himself a former Florida governor, by nearly 20 percentage points. The incumbent was able to make huge gains in onetime Democratic strongholds, including Miami-Dade County, where DeSantis defeated Crist by 11 points. DeSantis lost that county by more than 20 points in 2018.

Florida Republicans have made gains with Hispanic voters over the last four years, with voter registrations in Miami-Dade County among that demographic increasing by 2,409 in just July. Hispanics registered as Democrats dropped by 241 voters during that same period.

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Republicans nationwide say that growth is reflective of a nationwide trend among Hispanic voters that has accelerated under President Joe Biden. Democratic support among Hispanic voters has continued to slip over the last four years, decreasing by nearly 50% compared to the 2018 midterm elections — reaching its lowest point since 1994, according to a poll released in October.

© 2022 Washington Examiner

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