GOP deputy whip Guy Reschenthaler praises Republicans for taking ‘historic steps’ with debt ceiling

Guy Reschenthaler
Rep. Guy Reschenthaler, R-Pa., talks with an aide as the House Rules Committee meets to prepare Speaker Kevin McCarthy’s debt ceiling package for the floor, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 25, 2023. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

GOP deputy whip Guy Reschenthaler praises Republicans for taking ‘historic steps’ with debt ceiling

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GOP Chief Deputy Whip Guy Reschenthaler (R-PA) praised Republicans on the House floor for the debt ceiling bill earlier Wednesday.

Reschenthaler applauded the party on Wednesday afternoon for taking “historic steps” to address “out-of-control debt,” detailing key aspects of the bill, such as rescinding leftover COVID-19 funds and capping spending for the next two years, among other provisions.

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The deputy whip also expressed his support of the bill’s provision that completes the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

“MVP is near completion, for the last 14 miles — there’s just 14 miles left — the last 14 miles are being held up by extreme, radical, far-left judges,” Reschenthaler said. “When completed, this pipeline will help reduce costs for hardworking Americans in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia.”

He added that the pipeline would create “thousands” of jobs and “direct investment” for Midwestern and eastern states like Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia.

“Mr. Speaker, I support the rule in the underlying legislation. I urge my colleagues to do the same,” Reschenthaler said.

The House passed the debt ceiling bill on Wednesday evening with large bipartisan support. The Senate plans to “move quickly” on passing the bill, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) said following the rule’s passage. However, a single senator has the ability to delay the process, a prospect Schumer worries could cost valuable time.

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Senate leadership will likely need to iron out an agreement of their own once they receive the bill to allow several amendment votes from senators who object to certain provisions.

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen recently moved the “X-date,” the date the United States will default on its debts, to June 5. Her previous estimate had the date as June 1.

© 2023 Washington Examiner

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