Former teenage boyfriend of George Santos says incoming congressman lied to him, stole his phone

Election 2022 New York House
Republican candidate for New York’s 3rd Congressional District George Santos, right, talks to a voter while campaigning outside a Stop and Shop store, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2022, in Glen Cove, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) Mary Altaffer/AP

Former teenage boyfriend of George Santos says incoming congressman lied to him, stole his phone

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Embattled Rep.-elect George Santos of Long Island, New York, faces new criticism from a former romantic partner over lying about who he was during the couple’s relationship.

Santos’s ex-boyfriend, Pedro Vilarva, spoke out this weekend about dating and living with the incoming congressman nearly a decade ago following a story in the North Shore Leader newspaper that first called his claims into question.

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Vilarva was 18 years old in 2014 when he met a then-26-year-old Santos, according to a New York Times interview published Sunday. Vilarva found Santos charming and sweet, and the two moved in together after a few months.

Although Vilarva paid many of the couple’s bills, he said he felt so good in the relationship that the financial woes were not a deal breaker.

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“He used to say he would get money from Citigroup, he was an investor,” Vilarva said. “One day it’s one thing, one day it’s another thing. He never ever actually went to work.”

Not long into cohabitating, Vilarva said Santos lied and pretended to have bought them tickets for a trip to Hawaii. Santos also pawned Vilarva’s cellphone for cash, Vilarva believed.

Vilarva ultimately moved out abruptly after discovering that Santos was wanted by police in Brazil.

“I woke up in the morning, and I packed my stuff all in trash bags, and I called my father and I left,” Vilarva said.

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Santos was wanted in his home country for using a stolen checkbook to buy nearly $700 worth of merchandise at a clothing store in 2008. A Brazilian judge later subpoenaed him to court without success.

Recent reporting previously revealed that Santos had lied about numerous parts of his life, including claims that his grandparents were Ukrainian Jewish Holocaust survivors, that his mother was killed in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, that he worked at Goldman Sachs and Citigroup, and that he was Jewish. Santos admitted to lying on several parts of his resume in an interview with the New York Post, and he said other falsehoods were the result of miscommunication.

© 2023 Washington Examiner

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