Colorado becomes second state to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms

NETHERLANDS MAGIC MUSHROOMS
Magic mushrooms are being weighed and packaged at the Procare farm in Hazerswoude, central Netherlands, Friday Aug. 3, 2007. Procare is the Netherlands’ largest grower of hallucinatory mushrooms, supplying more than half the market, a legal business in The Netherlands as long as they are sold fresh. It’s high season for tourists, but for many the emphasis is on the word high. Thousands come specifically to smoke marijuana without fear of getting into trouble with the police. A relatively small number are interested in taking a ‘trip’ within a trip, using psychedelic mushrooms. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong) PETER DEJONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colorado becomes second state to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms

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Colorado has voted to decriminalize the possession and use of some hallucinogenic plants and fungi, including “magic” mushrooms, becoming the second state to do so.

The personal use, possession, growth, and transportation of certain plants and fungi in the state, including psilocybin, psilocyn, and ibogaine, which naturally have hallucinogenic effects when consumed, will be decriminalized for adults 21 and older.

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The passage of Proposition 122 does not provide for the retail sales of such substances, but the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies will be in charge of developing a therapeutic psychedelics program in which psilocybin and psilocyn could be administered to people at licensed healing centers.

The measure will not permit individual users to operate motor vehicles while under the influence of psychedelics or to be used in public settings other than licensed places.

It comes a decade after Colorado voted to legalize recreational marijuana, setting up the foundation for what is now a multibillion-dollar industry in the state with hundreds of marijuana dispensaries.

Natural Medicine Colorado, which sponsored the initiative, said it would “create regulated access to natural psychedelic medicines for veterans struggling with PTSD, people facing a terminal illness, and adults dealing with depression, anxiety and other mental health challenges in a way that maximizes safety.”

Opponents of the measure questioned the medical benefits psychedelics provide and argue they could harm people’s mental health.

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Colorado is the second state to decriminalize the substance after Oregon voters approved a ballot measure in 2020 with 55% support. Only a handful of other cities have passed local measures decriminalizing some psychedelics, including Denver and Washington, D.C.

© 2022 Washington Examiner

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