Army awards Lockheed Martin over $500 million to replenish US stockpiles

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Lockheed Martin Headquarters in Bethesda. Graeme Jennings/Washington Examiner

Army awards Lockheed Martin over $500 million to replenish US stockpiles

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The Army awarded multiple contract options to Lockheed Martin valued at more than $500 million to replenish Defense Department stockpiles that have been diminished through the military aid provided to Ukraine.

Specifically, the $520.814 million is to replenish the United States’s stockpile of Guided Missile Launch Rocket Systems.

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“These awards demonstrate the significant impact GMLRS are having on the battlefield as a vital combat capability for our international partners,” Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment William A. LaPlante said in a statement on Monday. “They are great examples of contracting approaches we are using to more rapidly accelerate award timelines and ultimately deliver capability.”

“This award enables us to replenish our own inventory while providing critical capabilities for our allies and international partners,” said Douglas R. Bush, the Army’s assistant secretary for acquisition, logistics, and technology. “We remain committed to getting things on contract as quickly as possible to ensure our stocks are rapidly replenished.”

The Biden administration has provided more than $18 billion worth of military aid to Ukraine since Russia invaded in late February. The U.S. announced its latest aid on Friday, valued at roughly $400 million.

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Weapons in the new package include missiles for HAWK air defense systems, four Avenger air defense systems, and Stinger missiles, as well as additional ammunition for High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems. Other provisions include 400 grenade launchers, demolition equipment to clear obstacles, and cold weather protective gear.

There have been two types of military aid packages: one through presidential drawdown authority, which means the weapons come from current U.S. stockpiles, and the other through the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative, which is a longer process and involves the U.S. paying for the procurement of the weapons.

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