Apple engaged in anti-union tactics at Maryland store, NLRB says

An Apple store
Shanghai, China – October 12, 2011: Glass entrance to the Apple Store at Nanjing road opened on the September 23, 2011. Many people inside and outside the shop. (iStock)

Apple engaged in anti-union tactics at Maryland store, NLRB says

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A federal labor official found Apple guilty of violating federal law by forcing employees to attend anti-unionization meetings, the latest development in a surge of interest in unionization across the United States.

The National Labor Relations Board’s Atlanta regional director, Lisa Henderson, ruled on Monday that allegations by the Communications Workers of America about employee treatment at an Apple Store in Cumberland, Maryland, held merit. The allegations included claims that Apple had forced employees to attend anti-union meetings and discriminated against pro-union staff.

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“Holding an illegal forced captive audience meeting is not only union-busting, but an example of psychological warfare,” CWA said in a statement. “We commend the NLRB for recognizing captive audience meetings for exactly what they are: a direct violation of labor rights.”

If Apple does not reach a proposed settlement, “the Regional Director will issue a complaint, which will result in a hearing with an NLRB Administrative Law Judge,” the labor organization said in a statement.

Apple has been the target of increased labor-related legal actions in recent weeks. The NLRB filed a complaint against Apple in October, alleging that the company had discriminated against its employees at the World Trade Center store when it stopped them from putting up fliers about unionization. At other Apple Stores, including in Towson, Maryland, unions have succeeded at forming.

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Other major corporations, including Starbucks and Amazon, have undergone unionization in smaller quantities. Employees have run into barriers set by corporations that have limited their ability to approve the formation of said unions.

Apple did not respond to requests for comment from the Washington Examiner.

© 2022 Washington Examiner

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